Round or Brisket Corned Beef

posted in: Beef | 4
Round Corned Beef
Round Corned Beef and Cabbage

Round or Brisket Corned Beef

Round or Brisket Corned Beef - Last night's dinner is one of my favorite! - A good old fashioned New England boiled dinner consisting of corned beef, cabbage, red potatoes, carrots, onions, with a side of horseradish. Does it get any better than this? I've learned that most people either love corned beef or not - no middle road. I happen to love corned beef!!!

Beef Chart

Corned Beef traditionally is a brisket cured in a brine solution of curing salts, regular salt, and pickling spices. Over the years I didn't think much about it - I just bought a Corned Beef at a store. Then I learned that a brisket corned beef can be the point or the flat. The point is fattier than the flat but then many believe that it has better flavor. Either way, a brisket corned beef is delicious boiled, roasted, or cooked low and slow.

A while back I picked up a corned beef at Costco without paying much attention to the cut. It turned out to be a USDA Choice Round Corned Beef. No big deal right?

A brisket corned beef and a round corned beef are from different ends of the steer. As you can see from the image below the Brisket is in the front and the Round is in the rear. Both cuts are the toughest parts of the steer since that's the muscles that get used the most. It's my understanding that the round corned beef is leaner than the brisket and is often used when making pastrami. All I know is that I prefer the round corned beef as it slices beautifully and tastes scrumptious.

Choice Round Corned Beef
Choice Round Corned Beef
Boiled Corned Beef
Boiled Corned Beef
Carved Corned Beef
Carved Corned Beef

Started with a 4.26 lb Costco Premium Shenson Butcher's Cut USDA choice Corned Beef Round roast in my largest pot with ample water to cover the Corned Beef. Brought the Corned Beef to a hard boil before covering and turning down the temperature to ensure a hard simmer. Simmered the Corned Beef Round for approximately 3 hours until the internal temperature reached 210ºF. Removed the Corned Beef Round, wrapped in foil, and set aside.

Used the same large pot and water used for boiling the Corned Beef Round to boil quartered cabbage, carrots, celery, and white onions. I used to also add potatoes to the same pot but have since been steaming my red potatoes in a separate pot. Simple meal but a very satisfying comfort food option ... Enjoy!!

4 Responses

  1. Round buyer at
    | Reply

    Thanks!

  2. Jean Hadlock
    | Reply

    I, too, use the Costco Corned Beef Round. What does “Butcher’s Cut” on the label mean? Also, since this is a corned beef round, does that mean it comes from the round and not the brisket? If it does come from the round, what part of the round? I prefer this cut because it seems leaner than others.

    I prepare my corned beef as instructed by my paternal grandfather, who passed in 1965. I cook the meat the day before serving, place the cooked meat in a plastic-wrapped pan that fits the piece of meat (bread pan or the like) cover with more plastic wrap, and place bricks on top to press the meat. Place in the refrigerator, and the next day remove any fat one wants (we like ours as lean as possible) and slice. Return the meat to an ovenproof pan, add a spoonful or so of saved stock, cover and warm in the oven. Then you have more room in the pot for the vegetables!

    • smokerpete
      | Reply

      Your Grandfather’s recipe sounds scrumptious. I’ll have to try it next time.

      The term “Butcher’s Cut” is a cut prized for its flavor. In the past it was sometimes known as a “butcher’s cut” because butchers would often keep it for themselves rather than offer it for sale.

      Yes, a Corned Beef Round does come from the round (the rear end) rather than a brisket (the front end) of a cow. The round is often used for pastrami.

  3. ronniej
    | Reply

    I had found a blog featuring this particular corned beef from Costco. Almost everyone expressed dissatisfaction about this cut. Some said it was overly salty, tough or dry. I was a little hesitant to try it–but so glad I did!
    link: http://costcocouple.com/shenson-corned-beef-round/

    I cooked this Shenson’s Round Corned Beef today and was very pleased with it. I rinsed it several times then let it sit in cold water for about 15 minutes before draining. I simmered in a slow cooker 8 hours on low, with red and yellow potatoes, onion, carrots–seasonings and spices. I added cabbage the last 45 minutes. It was tender, juicy and had lots of flavor. Till now, I have been confused about the different cuts of corned beef. Thank you for your clear explanation!

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